Cover your assets with a dental non-compliance form

At some point every dentist will have to tackle a tooth restoration. Of all the types of restoration, the most challenging is doing a composite restoration that looks good, functions well, has nice interproximal contacts, and isn’t sensitive.

It’s generally not the first recommended treatment in your care arsenal. But often it’s what the patient wants. 

Just be certain to let them know to expect sensitvity during it and that the process will need a root canal and crown to finish.

But a restoration can create more clinical problems than anything else we do in our day to day practice. In most cases, a better treatment plan might include an inlay, onlay, or crown rather than a very large and complex composite restoration.

When the patient refuses the most appropriate treatment plan, always have them sign a non compliance form. Such forms are signed by both the doctor and patient, stating what was recommended for treatment and what your patient has elected to do.

Let me be candid: performing a treatment you do not agree with should be avoided. However, in the real world, often you will have make compromises. And in such cases it’s important to protect yourself and your practice.

A non compliance form decreases the chances of a patient requesting that a failed treatment be conducted at no charge or even taking legal actions against you or your company for the results.

I recommend informing all patients considering large restorations that there will be very probably be sensitivity issues that may require a root-canal treatment, and most likely a crown to fix.

This disclosure should always be made before you perform the procedure, as it shows you to be an astute clinician; when done afterward, you only appear to be making an excuse.

If you’d like to learn more about the best practices for your dental operation, please contact me for a consultation.