treat-dental-patients-like-customers

A patient in distress is your opportunity to shine in customer care

Here’s the scenario: a new patient calls your office with an issue that needs attention.

If they’re calling because of an emergency, your staff should treat it like one. First of all appreciate they chose you over a competitor. Maybe it was your website, advertising, or word of mouth. But they chose you and it's your job to let them know it was a smart call on their part by delivering excellent service.

customer-service-and-dental-practicesOnce they’ve told you or your staff the issue as they see it, work to be both empathetic and clinical by asking them to quantify their pain on a scale from zero to ten.

Once your office  has an idea of how much discomfort they are in, they next goal is to get a location. This will help the front-desk coordinator estimate the time needed for an appointment and, perhaps, even the seriousness of the problem.

Is this an issue that has come on suddenly or has it progressively gotten worse over time? The answer to this question provides clues as to their current circumstances regarding income and benefit coverage.

Someone  with a pain level of ten that has endured for more than a few days has likely been holding off on care and treatment due to fear or finances.

This isn’t always the case. Extremely busy individuals will often put off care and treatment as long as possible because they believe treatment to be an inconvenience that will eat up valuable time.

Others have nothing but time, but lack the financial resources to obtain care. Still others are somewhere in the middle, wise enough to understand they require care and treatment but hope their issues will resolve on their own.

In all cases, I recommend you offer a patient either the option to come in immediately or sometime that day. This is an important concept to understand. I am well aware that you may not be able to accommodate Mr. or Ms. Smith on a particular day. However, experience has taught me that most people want to have their pain acknowledged and an offer to see them as soon as possible, while rarely accepted, is an important part of the customer experience.

Getting someone through your the door is for an initial assessment is different than fixing the problem immediately. In the most cases, having someone come in for evaluation of his or her chief complaint, taking a radiograph, and coming up with the diagnosis, treatment plan, and perhaps prescriptions are all that will be needed. The actual care can be done on another day.

If the chief complaint is severe, in most cases your well-trained staff should be able to temporarily alleviate discomfort by, if in the case of an abscess, opening the tooth and allowing for drainage. Your team should be able to extract the tooth or provide some type of temporary or long-lasting restoration. For offices that avoid specialty care, a prescription and referral often are all that is necessary to provide steller service.

I’m a firm believer that for a general dental practice, the more specialty care you deliver the better your overall service and care will be. Although most dentists feel that it’s simpler and less stressful to delegate specialty care out to specialists, it is my belief that most general dentists should be able to provide over 90 percent of all treatment as long as adequate effort and training are present.

The tremendous goodwill that you create by helping Mr. and Ms. Smith with a quick radiograph and referral slip cannot be overstated. In today’s environment, increased specialization has created an almost impossible scenario for patients to receive any kind of treatment from start to finish on the same day. While this lowers expectations of “quick fixes” it also results in inconvenience and increased costs to patients. If you can manage to “do more” you will see immediate service improvements and more profitability as your word-of-mouth referrals increase.

The goal of your dental practice should be to create what I refer to as “raving fans,” who support your practice and are so satisfied with your care and service that they cannot help but tell family, friends, and associates.

I would be happy to discuss how to turn your dental practice into a service dynamo. Please contact me for a quick chat about improving your bottom line and patient outcomes with excellent customer service.

I would be happy to discuss how to turn your dental practice into a service dynamo. Please contact me for a quick chat about improving your bottom line and patient outcomes with excellent customer service.